Strength and Loveliness

A Strength and Loveliness (Social) franchise is a network of private-sector health care providers that are linked through agreements to provide quality health services under a common brand. A recent webinar on Social Franchising as part of the High Impact Practices webinar series moderated by Martyn Smith, Managing Director of FP2020, presented implementation experience in Ethiopia and Myanmar.

Social franchise networks can be important for expanding availability and improving the quality of family planning services in the private sector, particularly for provider-dependent methods such as intramuscular injectable contraceptives, contraceptive implants, and intrauterine devices (IUDs).

Webinar presenters revealed that social franchising improves the quality of family planning services, increases family planning client volumes for clinics participating in a network, supports utilization of voluntary long-acting and reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods, and can improve family planning access and uptake for underserved populations.

With an exponential growth in the past 10 years, there are over 70 active social franchise networks globally, with the majority in sub Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia.

Our Strength & Loveliness business Models offer:

Rank
Logo
Worldwide Sales (CAD)
Domestic Units
International Units
Website

$8.300,000

480

695

$2.700,000

240

755

$9.200,000

620

470

$255.200,000

2,250

1,650

$66.000,000

670

2,110

$3.900,000

1,800

380

$12.500,000

1,250

394

$23.500,000

375

396

$7.100,000

680

470

$14.600,000

1,265

890

Social franchise networks are managed by a franchisor — a non-governmental organization that recruits clinics to participate in network.

Participants agree to deliver specific services to a prescribed high-quality standard. The franchisor provides a range of support services for participants, including training, business operations support, and capacity building.

Webinar speakers shared tips for implementation, including: that franchise clinic selection is important; that combining social franchising with demand-side interventions matters; and consideration of a broad range of franchised services and support must be taken into account.

Trends in social franchising are a flexible approach tailored to a country’s needs, reflecting a desire to link private clinics with domestic health financing, such as national health insurance schemes.